Category Archives: Monitored Sessions

Video demonstrations of remote viewing sessions with a monitor.

Remote Viewing an Anomaly Photographed by the Phobos 2 Spacecraft

Phobos, one of two moons orbiting Mars

Phobos, one of two moons orbiting Mars

The Cue: Describe the most important aspects of the target event at the instant of original imaging by the Phobos 2 spacecraft.

Monitor: Jerry Harthcock

I was blind to the target and the cue. The monitor (Jerry) was semi-frontloaded: He chose the target and created the cue.

In July 1988, Russia launched two unmanned probes—Phobos 1 and Phobos 2—to study Mars and its moons, Phobos and Deimos. Fourteen additional nations participated in the  mission, including the United States, Sweden, West Germany and France.

The last photograph taken by the Phobos 2 Mars probe, which shows what appears to be a very large cylindrical object moving towards the small moon.

The last photograph taken by the Phobos 2 Mars probe.

Phobos 1 suffered a critical software failure and was lost before reaching Mars. Phobos 2 successfully entered orbit around Mars and sent back a total of 37 images before communication with the probe was lost on March 27, 1989.

Several of the photos taken by Phobos 2 show strange anomalies on both Mars and its moon Phobos. The final photo shows what appears to be a very large cylindrical object moving towards the small moon.

In this session, I was tasked to describe the most important aspects of the target event captured by Phobos 2 in the last photo taken by the probe before its systems failed.

Sketch of the Phobos Moon by Edward Riordan

Sketch done in-session by Edward Riordan

Because of the unusual nature of this target, I found it difficult to write this article as some of the information is very strange.  At this time, I cannot verify most of the perceptions that came through. However, several of my drawings resembled the probe and one drawing resembled the Phobos moon itself.

I perceived a colony of organic biological life forms at the site, which were in a type of incubation process. Some of the life forms were flawed and being rejected, while the rest were being pulled back into itself as if filtering out what was not its own. It appeared that the incubation process and growth rate were dependent on climate and fluctuating temperatures. The life forms had a spongy texture, which was moldy and porous.

 

Remote Viewing Session:
The International Space Station

Astronauts Robert L. Curbeam (USA) and Christer Fuglesang (Sweden) upgrading the power grid and attaching a new truss segment to the International Space Station. December 25, 2006.

Astronauts Robert L. Curbeam (USA) and Christer Fuglesang (Sweden) upgrading the power grid and attaching a new truss segment to the International Space Station. December 25, 2006.

The Task: Upgrading the International Space Station on December 25, 2006.

The Cue: Describe this event and place.

Monitor: Todd Ronan

The monitor and I were completely blind to the target and the cue.

The International Space Station is the largest man-made object orbiting Earth. A joint project including five different space agencies, the ISS serves as a research laboratory conducting experiments in biology, physics, meteorology and other fields. Occupied since November 2000, the station has housed the longest continual human presence in space.

In this session, I was tasked to remote view the International Space Station during an upgrade on December 25, 2006. I perceived a series of man-made objects, which together acted like a tuning fork that created feedback resonance between the objects. This resonance was associated with a theory on how things interact with each other. Some people believed that the theory was flawed and would fail. The resonance felt like an x-ray moving through my body, and it felt real to me. Long-term exposure to this feedback radiation affects the biology of those who are exposed to it, and it specifically affects the nervous system and the genetic code.

During post-session analysis and research, I learned that a group of Austrian scientists have proposed a series of experiments to test the theory of quantum entanglement using equipment on the Space Station. Quantum entanglement occurs when two connected but separated particles share information instantaneously. After installing a photon detection module onto one of the existing cameras on the Space Station, scientists on Earth will send individual entangled photons to the detection module.

Quantum physicists have successfully transported entangled photons 143 kilometers using lasers and 250 kilometers over optical fiber in the lab. The proposed tests using the Space Station would determine if it is possible to reliably transmit entangled photons over long distances, and may also shed light on gravity’s effect on quantum entanglement. If successful, these tests could prove the possibility of a satellite-based communication network using entangled photons. I don’t know if the 2006 upgrades to the ISS were related to the quantum entanglement research, but I believe my attention was pulled toward these experiments.

 

And here is a news clip about proposed quantum entanglement experiments that would be conducted on the International Space Station: