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Articles about remote viewing, on a variety of subjects.

Remote Viewing Protocol:
Stage 1 Revisited

Stage 1 Ideogram by Edward Riordan

Stage 1 Ideogram by Edward Riordan

The Controlled Remote Viewing protocol consists of six commonly used stages, each with its own unique objective. The objective of Stage 1 is to connect with the target. The viewer produces a quick kinesthetic response upon receiving a target reference number. This doodle is called an ideogram.

Because it is drawn reflexively by the nervous system, the ideogram is a stylized representation of the gestalt of the target or one aspect of the target. Generally, it is a simple line drawing of an angle or squiggle. The viewer then describes the overall motion and feeling of the ideogram, and concludes Stage 1 with a brief analytical label of the target—i.e., land, water, or structure.

Feeling Confident in Stage 1

The first stage—also referred to as the Ideogram A/B process or IAB—may be the least understood stage in CRV, and as a result, it is often executed incorrectly.

I have practiced remote viewing for over a decade, and until recently, I did not understand the importance of Stage 1. The initial training I received had not prepared me to successfully execute or utilize this stage. In fact, not only was I missing the point, I was taking IAB for granted.

Stages 2-6 are much better spent describing the target rather than searching for it. Stage 1 is where the rubber meets the road, and without that connection, you might end up in a ditch.

So instead of feeling confident and connected with the “signal line” from the beginning, I worked my way into the signal line—a process that at its worst might consume the entire remote viewing session.

This flawed system worked for me to a degree, but now I know that Stages 2-6 are much better spent describing the target rather than searching for it. In short, Stage 1 is where the rubber meets the road, and without that connection, you might end up in a ditch.

Being Open to the “Signal”

To be successful in Stage 1 requires receptivity and honesty—you need to be open to the signal and honest with yourself. A degree of humility is required to be able to discern subtle data that is not sourced by your ego, which may be driven by the need to be “right” or succeed.

If your analytical mind is producing the ideogram, you’re missing the objective of Stage 1. If you’re not confident that you have the signal here, then you need to start over again.

Learning to Perceive Data

Stage 1 may be the most difficult stage to teach and grasp. How do you teach someone to perceive psychic data? Any language-based attempt to teach someone to recognize a psychic data stream about a remote viewing target would be sorely inadequate. It is an inner process that cannot be expressed in language. Such data are uniquely individual—I cannot experience what you are experiencing.

To build confidence in your inner perceptions requires objective self-observation; you need to become familiar with the boundaries and language of your own inner noise before you can feel certain about new information entering your psyche.

Here we begin to enter the realms of consciousness explored in meditation, spirituality and poetry. This is also the connection, known as the Muse, which has inspired artists throughout history. The remote viewing protocol is, from this perspective, just another tool for accessing those subtle parts of our consciousness that do not communicate with the language we use daily. And, like an artist, the remote viewer objectifies the data stream.

To build confidence in your inner perceptions requires objective self-observation; you need to become familiar with the boundaries and language of your own inner noise before you can feel certain about new information entering your psyche. There are many ways to explore one’s psyche, including sensory deprivation, meditation, chanting, altered states of consciousness, etc. It may take some time and practice, but don’t be discouraged. It will pay off!

Viewer Anxiety:
The Van Allen Belt of Remote Viewing

When I began my training in remote viewing, I was so busy learning the structure I didn’t have time to worry about “missing” the target. I didn’t have expectations that I would succeed in “hitting” the target. That was a great place to be. Little did I know that I was about to embark on a journey that would take me away from that safe space and drop me right in the middle of  my own personal “stuff.”

Over the years, I have been through some tough turns, which were always great learning lessons. Luckily, I eventually came back to the place where that unattached mindset was accessible to me more or less on command.

My Battle with My Ego Begins

I remember it clearly, although I don’t remember exactly when it happened. It was probably right after my first successful remote viewing session. I remember feeling like I had made it. It could only get better from here—I was going to master this skill and become a famous remote viewer.

With practice, you can train your mind to let go of anxiety. This is a skill that is required for all high-level mental functioning. It is not isolated to remote viewing—any skilled athlete or performer would also need to learn how to overcome anxiety.

I was still high from this success when I prepared for my next practice session. I was feeling extremely confident. As I gathered my paper and pen, I reviewed the structure in my mind. Then it hit—that feeling of anxiety starting with tension in my stomach and spreading from there. Doubts flooded my thoughts. What if I miss this one? What if my session is total crap? What if that last hit was a fluke? Am I just a flash in the pan? What if I freeze in the middle of the session? AOL! AOL! Calgon take me away!

A Rite of Passage

Viewer anxiety is a rite of passage for any dedicated remote viewer. I liken it to the Van Allen Belt surrounding planet Earth, through which an astronaut must pass on the way to the Moon. If you survive the journey through it, you just might be in for the long haul.

Viewer anxiety can be so dangerous and painful that some beginners will never get through it. It can send them crashing back to Earth feeling defeated and bruised.

Let’s be honest—viewer anxiety is really a fear of failure, and if you fail, it’s your ego that gets bruised. Remote viewing will slap your ego silly and kick it when it’s down. And for good reason, I might add, because the ego is full of bad habits. The ego thinks it knows what’s best and what’s right. And during a remote viewing session, that doesn’t always equate to “the target.”

I am not saying that remote viewers don’t have egos! In fact, making it through the remote viewing Van Allen Belt and hitting the Moon a few times can definitely fill your ego with rocket fuel. It can happen. But if your ego is too involved in your remote viewing sessions, it is in for the worst beating of its life! It cannot be allowed to run the show, or your sessions will suffer.

Surviving the Van Allen Belt

I’ve had my share of sessions that had little to do with the feedback photo. During my training with F.M. Bonsall, he told me to focus on perfecting the structure instead of trying to get the target. Remaining unattached to the feedback photo and the outcome of the session would relieve my anxiety. I made a habit of this, and it got me through those tough years.

F.M.’s advice helped me tremendously to understand the importance of the structure and to view the entire remote viewing session as a snapshot of my own consciousness. Instead of feeling bruised and battered, I became fascinated by what was happening in my mind and body as I put it all down on paper. This process has helped me to understand more about myself than anything else I have done in my entire life.

Overcoming Viewer Anxiety

There are many ways to deal with viewer anxiety, but first you need to observe yourself and recognize what is going on. In many cases, the simple act of observing your anxiety can make it disappear. With practice, you can train your mind to let go of anxiety. This is a skill that is required for all high-level mental functioning. It is not isolated to remote viewing—any skilled athlete or performer would also need to learn how to overcome anxiety. So don’t give up—you can train your mind to be fully aware and present during the remote viewing structure, without the mental chatter and physical discomfort caused by anxiety.

So I say to all aspiring remote viewers out there, you are not alone if you are feeling viewer anxiety. But I have good news for you: If you can recognize it and change your perception of it, you just might make it to the Moon!